INTRODUCTION: CONVICT TICKETS OF LEAVE IN NSW 1788 TO 1850

Sample Ticket of Leave

A ticket of leave was a licence for a convict to be at large (Note 1). The ticket holder was permitted to be "off stores" and to work on his or her own account, subject to good behaviour. The ticket holder was confined to a named district, and required to attend regular musters and church services. The granting of a ticket did not result in a remission of sentence, and the ticket was liable to be revoked and the convict returned to service or confinement.

SCOPE OF RESEARCH PROJECT

This paper examines the development of the law and practice governing convict tickets of leave in the colony of New South Wales from 1788 to 1850.

The paper focusses on the mainstream convict system in NSW. It does not cover Van Diemen's Land, nor the places of secondary punishment in NSW (Note 2). Research was aimed at answers to the following questions:

METHODOLOGY

Research emphasis has been on contemporary records, such as: Some convict records have been examined (indents, musters, census, ticket of leave registers and ticket butts) using statistical sampling techniques (Note 3).


The next part is Ticket of Leave Regulations, Part 1: From the earliest times until Governor Macquarie

NOTES

Note 1 The ticket of leave survived in NSW as a license granted to an offender by the Governor, with the advice of the Executive Council, to be at large, within limits specified in the license, during the unexpired portion of his sentence, subject to any specified conditions. Such license was revocable on breach of a condition of the license: section 463 Crimes Act 1900 (NSW). POSTSCRIPT: This provision was repealed in 1989 (NSW Act No.219 of 1989, secion 5.

Note 2 Coal River, Port Macquarie, Moreton Bay and later, Norfolk Island.

Note 3 Sampling methodology is described in Appendix 1.


The next part is Ticket of Leave Regulations, Part 1: From the earliest times until Governor Macquarie

©   Copyright Sid Hammell 1992: last updated August 2008